The Constitution: on Being a Citizen and Person

Governments have a rule they like to enforce. Defining the standards for citizenship is fundamental to the organization of society. The State has emerged as the final arbitrator for disputes, especially conflicts between the ‘person’, and the government. But is any person a citizen? The wording within the U.S. Constitution on this topic is clear and indisputable.

Amendment IV: Section 1 – “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside.” From the outset, it should be obvious that persons who were not born and have not completed the naturalization process, are not considered to be a citizen. When arguments are offered up that the Constitution defines a person to include both natural and artificial persons, the courts have departed from the original meaning, and have greatly expanded their interpretation.


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